Discussion:
Soviet anthem author died
(too old to reply)
J. Anderson
2009-08-27 15:59:41 UTC
Permalink
Russian anthem author Mikhalkov dies at 96

AP - 27 August 2009 19:53:25 By MANSUR MIROVALEV

Sergei Mikhalkov, an author favored by Stalin who wrote the lyrics for the Soviet and Russian national anthems, persecuted dissident writers as part of the Soviet propaganda machine and fathered two noted film directors, has died at age 96.

Mikhalkov died in a Moscow hospital on Thursday, said Denis Baglai, a spokesman for his son, director Nikita Mikhalkov. Baglai said he had no further details immediately.

The death of a man whose life and achievements embodied most of Russia's Communist era was mourned by Russian leaders and received extensive coverage on state television.

"At all times, Sergei Vladimirovich lived up to the interests of his motherland, served it and believed in it," President Dmitry Medvedev said in a statement.

In 1943, Mikhalkov, a young author and war correspondent whose poems were favored by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, was commissioned to write lyrics for a new Soviet anthem designed to inspire Red Army soldiers in the midst of World War II.

Mikhalkov's lyrics, co-written with journalist El Registan and set to music by Alexander Alexandrov, lauded Stalin who "brought us up on loyalty to the people" and "inspired us to labor and to heroism."

The anthem propelled Mikhalkov into stardom that outlived Stalin and the system he created. After the dictator's death in 1953, the anthem was mostly performed without the lyrics, but Mikhalkov remained one of the most vocal and outspoken bards of Communism.

He received numerous state awards for his children's books, film scripts, plays and fiction. He churned out adaptations of Russian and European classics -- including Mark Twain's "The Prince and the Pauper" -- transforming them according to Politburo-prescribed ideological recipes.
vello
2009-08-27 17:29:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Anderson
Russian anthem author Mikhalkov dies at 96
AP - 27 August 2009 19:53:25 By MANSUR MIROVALEV
Sergei Mikhalkov, an author favored by Stalin who wrote the lyrics for the Soviet and Russian national anthems, persecuted dissident writers as part of the Soviet propaganda machine and fathered two noted film directors, has died at age 96.
Mikhalkov died in a Moscow hospital on Thursday, said Denis Baglai, a spokesman for his son, director Nikita Mikhalkov. Baglai said he had no further details immediately.
The death of a man whose life and achievements embodied most of Russia's Communist era was mourned by Russian leaders and received extensive coverage on state television.
"At all times, Sergei Vladimirovich lived up to the interests of his motherland, served it and believed in it," President Dmitry Medvedev said in a statement.
In 1943, Mikhalkov, a young author and war correspondent whose poems were favored by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, was commissioned to write lyrics for a new Soviet anthem designed to inspire Red Army soldiers in the midst of World War II.
Mikhalkov's lyrics, co-written with journalist El Registan and set to music by Alexander Alexandrov, lauded Stalin who "brought us up on loyalty to the people" and "inspired us to labor and to heroism."
The anthem propelled Mikhalkov into stardom that outlived Stalin and the system he created. After the dictator's death in 1953, the anthem was mostly performed without the lyrics, but Mikhalkov remained one of the most vocal and outspoken bards of Communism.
He received numerous state awards for his children's books, film scripts, plays and fiction. He churned out adaptations of Russian and European classics -- including Mark Twain's "The Prince and the Pauper" -- transforming them according to Politburo-prescribed ideological recipes.
The King is dead, long live the King! I think there is a lot of market
for patriotical music in russia now so new generation will come for
sure.
Vladimir Makarenko
2009-08-28 01:23:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by vello
Post by J. Anderson
Russian anthem author Mikhalkov dies at 96
AP - 27 August 2009 19:53:25 By MANSUR MIROVALEV
Sergei Mikhalkov, an author favored by Stalin who wrote the lyrics for the Soviet and Russian national anthems, persecuted dissident writers as part of the Soviet propaganda machine and fathered two noted film directors, has died at age 96.
Mikhalkov died in a Moscow hospital on Thursday, said Denis Baglai, a spokesman for his son, director Nikita Mikhalkov. Baglai said he had no further details immediately.
The death of a man whose life and achievements embodied most of Russia's Communist era was mourned by Russian leaders and received extensive coverage on state television.
"At all times, Sergei Vladimirovich lived up to the interests of his motherland, served it and believed in it," President Dmitry Medvedev said in a statement.
In 1943, Mikhalkov, a young author and war correspondent whose poems were favored by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, was commissioned to write lyrics for a new Soviet anthem designed to inspire Red Army soldiers in the midst of World War II.
Mikhalkov's lyrics, co-written with journalist El Registan and set to music by Alexander Alexandrov, lauded Stalin who "brought us up on loyalty to the people" and "inspired us to labor and to heroism."
The anthem propelled Mikhalkov into stardom that outlived Stalin and the system he created. After the dictator's death in 1953, the anthem was mostly performed without the lyrics, but Mikhalkov remained one of the most vocal and outspoken bards of Communism.
He received numerous state awards for his children's books, film scripts, plays and fiction. He churned out adaptations of Russian and European classics -- including Mark Twain's "The Prince and the Pauper" -- transforming them according to Politburo-prescribed ideological recipes.
The King is dead, long live the King! I think there is a lot of market
for patriotical music in russia now so new generation will come for
sure.
There are today much more gifted accountants and lawyers in Russia than
music generators. THIS should really concern you.

VM.
vello
2009-08-28 07:40:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by J. Anderson
Russian anthem author Mikhalkov dies at 96
AP - 27 August 2009 19:53:25 By MANSUR MIROVALEV
Sergei Mikhalkov, an author favored by Stalin who wrote the lyrics for the Soviet and Russian national anthems, persecuted dissident writers as part of the Soviet propaganda machine and fathered two noted film directors, has died at age 96.
Mikhalkov died in a Moscow hospital on Thursday, said Denis Baglai, a spokesman for his son, director Nikita Mikhalkov. Baglai said he had no further details immediately.
The death of a man whose life and achievements embodied most of Russia's Communist era was mourned by Russian leaders and received extensive coverage on state television.
"At all times, Sergei Vladimirovich lived up to the interests of his motherland, served it and believed in it," President Dmitry Medvedev said in a statement.
In 1943, Mikhalkov, a young author and war correspondent whose poems were favored by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, was commissioned to write lyrics for a new Soviet anthem designed to inspire Red Army soldiers in the midst of World War II.
Mikhalkov's lyrics, co-written with journalist El Registan and set to music by Alexander Alexandrov, lauded Stalin who "brought us up on loyalty to the people" and "inspired us to labor and to heroism."
The anthem propelled Mikhalkov into stardom that outlived Stalin and the system he created. After the dictator's death in 1953, the anthem was mostly performed without the lyrics, but Mikhalkov remained one of the most vocal and outspoken bards of Communism.
He received numerous state awards for his children's books, film scripts, plays and fiction. He churned out adaptations of Russian and European classics -- including Mark Twain's "The Prince and the Pauper" -- transforming them according to Politburo-prescribed ideological recipes.
The King is dead, long live the King! I think there is a lot of market
for patriotical music in russia now so new generation will come for
sure.
There are today much more gifted accountants and lawyers in Russia than
music generators. THIS should really concern you.
VM
Why concern - it's for good?
Vladimir Makarenko
2009-08-28 15:59:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by J. Anderson
Russian anthem author Mikhalkov dies at 96
AP - 27 August 2009 19:53:25 By MANSUR MIROVALEV
Sergei Mikhalkov, an author favored by Stalin who wrote the lyrics for the Soviet and Russian national anthems, persecuted dissident writers as part of the Soviet propaganda machine and fathered two noted film directors, has died at age 96.
Mikhalkov died in a Moscow hospital on Thursday, said Denis Baglai, a spokesman for his son, director Nikita Mikhalkov. Baglai said he had no further details immediately.
The death of a man whose life and achievements embodied most of Russia's Communist era was mourned by Russian leaders and received extensive coverage on state television.
"At all times, Sergei Vladimirovich lived up to the interests of his motherland, served it and believed in it," President Dmitry Medvedev said in a statement.
In 1943, Mikhalkov, a young author and war correspondent whose poems were favored by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, was commissioned to write lyrics for a new Soviet anthem designed to inspire Red Army soldiers in the midst of World War II.
Mikhalkov's lyrics, co-written with journalist El Registan and set to music by Alexander Alexandrov, lauded Stalin who "brought us up on loyalty to the people" and "inspired us to labor and to heroism."
The anthem propelled Mikhalkov into stardom that outlived Stalin and the system he created. After the dictator's death in 1953, the anthem was mostly performed without the lyrics, but Mikhalkov remained one of the most vocal and outspoken bards of Communism.
He received numerous state awards for his children's books, film scripts, plays and fiction. He churned out adaptations of Russian and European classics -- including Mark Twain's "The Prince and the Pauper" -- transforming them according to Politburo-prescribed ideological recipes.
The King is dead, long live the King! I think there is a lot of market
for patriotical music in russia now so new generation will come for
sure.
There are today much more gifted accountants and lawyers in Russia than
music generators. THIS should really concern you.
VM
Why concern - it's for good?
Depends what reference frame you choose.
Remember when we were young - money were important but as "utility" not
some icon, ultimate measure of life.
And too many young at least in Russia today are obsessed with making
fortunes.
Reading today's Russia media you see "Putin", I see endless pursuit of
money at any price. Putin muzzled this race - to some extent, but the
beast is in no way subdued.
Quite disgusting and BORING. And people who are after money only are
dangerous, - they have no limits.

VM.
vello
2009-08-31 13:44:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by J. Anderson
Russian anthem author Mikhalkov dies at 96
AP - 27 August 2009 19:53:25 By MANSUR MIROVALEV
Sergei Mikhalkov, an author favored by Stalin who wrote the lyrics for the Soviet and Russian national anthems, persecuted dissident writers as part of the Soviet propaganda machine and fathered two noted film directors, has died at age 96.
Mikhalkov died in a Moscow hospital on Thursday, said Denis Baglai, a spokesman for his son, director Nikita Mikhalkov. Baglai said he had no further details immediately.
The death of a man whose life and achievements embodied most of Russia's Communist era was mourned by Russian leaders and received extensive coverage on state television.
"At all times, Sergei Vladimirovich lived up to the interests of his motherland, served it and believed in it," President Dmitry Medvedev said in a statement.
In 1943, Mikhalkov, a young author and war correspondent whose poems were favored by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, was commissioned to write lyrics for a new Soviet anthem designed to inspire Red Army soldiers in the midst of World War II.
Mikhalkov's lyrics, co-written with journalist El Registan and set to music by Alexander Alexandrov, lauded Stalin who "brought us up on loyalty to the people" and "inspired us to labor and to heroism."
The anthem propelled Mikhalkov into stardom that outlived Stalin and the system he created. After the dictator's death in 1953, the anthem was mostly performed without the lyrics, but Mikhalkov remained one of the most vocal and outspoken bards of Communism.
He received numerous state awards for his children's books, film scripts, plays and fiction. He churned out adaptations of Russian and European classics -- including Mark Twain's "The Prince and the Pauper" -- transforming them according to Politburo-prescribed ideological recipes.
The King is dead, long live the King! I think there is a lot of market
for patriotical music in russia now so new generation will come for
sure.
There are today much more gifted accountants and lawyers in Russia than
music generators. THIS should really concern you.
VM
Why concern - it's for good?
Depends what reference frame you choose.
Remember when we were young - money were important but as "utility" not
some icon, ultimate measure of life.
And too many young at least in Russia today are obsessed with making
fortunes.
Reading today's Russia media you see "Putin", I see endless pursuit of
money at any price. Putin muzzled this race - to some extent, but the
beast is in no way subdued.
Quite disgusting and BORING. And people who are after money only are
dangerous, - they have no limits.
VM.
Yeah, I remember those days. Not all I dream about back then was in
reality as nice. But that's the fate of dreams. Problem you describe
is serious and not typical just to Russia. Just fascism is not answer,
not solution. It's more like alcohol - giving temporary feel that
problems are beaten. There is sole medicine against that thing - real
media. Media belonging to as much owners as possible to turn them all
watchdogs for wrongdoings of other media owners, politicians, big
money. What is essential, it is belief amoung young journalists that
if they got Putin (Deripaska, Gusinsky - no matter) on photo with his
willie on some lady's mouth, it may make them superrich. Idealists are
too weak to control the society - idealists are minority forever. But
knowing that dragging black business of high official into media light
may make one rich puts 1000 times more watchdogs looking for health of
democracy and fight corruption. Their motivation is not as nice as of
idealists one - but it works as well.

Fascism, like all -isms are just dream. Mussolini puts trains arrive
in time - and his time was sole period mafia was totally beaten. But
as whole, Duce was unable to bring some real good to his nation.
Vladimir Makarenko
2009-08-31 19:13:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by J. Anderson
Russian anthem author Mikhalkov dies at 96
AP - 27 August 2009 19:53:25 By MANSUR MIROVALEV
Sergei Mikhalkov, an author favored by Stalin who wrote the lyrics for the Soviet and Russian national anthems, persecuted dissident writers as part of the Soviet propaganda machine and fathered two noted film directors, has died at age 96.
Mikhalkov died in a Moscow hospital on Thursday, said Denis Baglai, a spokesman for his son, director Nikita Mikhalkov. Baglai said he had no further details immediately.
The death of a man whose life and achievements embodied most of Russia's Communist era was mourned by Russian leaders and received extensive coverage on state television.
"At all times, Sergei Vladimirovich lived up to the interests of his motherland, served it and believed in it," President Dmitry Medvedev said in a statement.
In 1943, Mikhalkov, a young author and war correspondent whose poems were favored by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, was commissioned to write lyrics for a new Soviet anthem designed to inspire Red Army soldiers in the midst of World War II.
Mikhalkov's lyrics, co-written with journalist El Registan and set to music by Alexander Alexandrov, lauded Stalin who "brought us up on loyalty to the people" and "inspired us to labor and to heroism."
The anthem propelled Mikhalkov into stardom that outlived Stalin and the system he created. After the dictator's death in 1953, the anthem was mostly performed without the lyrics, but Mikhalkov remained one of the most vocal and outspoken bards of Communism.
He received numerous state awards for his children's books, film scripts, plays and fiction. He churned out adaptations of Russian and European classics -- including Mark Twain's "The Prince and the Pauper" -- transforming them according to Politburo-prescribed ideological recipes.
The King is dead, long live the King! I think there is a lot of market
for patriotical music in russia now so new generation will come for
sure.
There are today much more gifted accountants and lawyers in Russia than
music generators. THIS should really concern you.
VM
Why concern - it's for good?
Depends what reference frame you choose.
Remember when we were young - money were important but as "utility" not
some icon, ultimate measure of life.
And too many young at least in Russia today are obsessed with making
fortunes.
Reading today's Russia media you see "Putin", I see endless pursuit of
money at any price. Putin muzzled this race - to some extent, but the
beast is in no way subdued.
Quite disgusting and BORING. And people who are after money only are
dangerous, - they have no limits.
VM.
Yeah, I remember those days. Not all I dream about back then was in
reality as nice. But that's the fate of dreams. Problem you describe
is serious and not typical just to Russia. Just fascism is not answer,
Who said that fascism is the answer?
Post by vello
not solution. It's more like alcohol - giving temporary feel that
problems are beaten. There is sole medicine against that thing - real
media. Media belonging to as much owners as possible to turn them all
watchdogs for wrongdoings of other media owners, politicians, big
money. What is essential, it is belief amoung young journalists that
if they got Putin (Deripaska, Gusinsky - no matter) on photo with his
willie on some lady's mouth, it may make them superrich. Idealists are
too weak to control the society - idealists are minority forever. But
knowing that dragging black business of high official into media light
may make one rich puts 1000 times more watchdogs looking for health of
democracy and fight corruption. Their motivation is not as nice as of
idealists one - but it works as well.
Society needs to orient youngsters, today in Russia there is very little
orientation on average given except - make a buck, buy a fancy car, blah
blah blah.
Post by vello
Fascism, like all -isms are just dream. Mussolini puts trains arrive
in time - and his time was sole period mafia was totally beaten. But
as whole, Duce was unable to bring some real good to his nation.
Why you bring in fascism or Mussolini? As far as I remember neither of
the two promoted individual wealth as a life goal.

VM.
vello
2009-08-31 19:35:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by J. Anderson
Russian anthem author Mikhalkov dies at 96
AP - 27 August 2009 19:53:25 By MANSUR MIROVALEV
Sergei Mikhalkov, an author favored by Stalin who wrote the lyrics for the Soviet and Russian national anthems, persecuted dissident writers as part of the Soviet propaganda machine and fathered two noted film directors, has died at age 96.
Mikhalkov died in a Moscow hospital on Thursday, said Denis Baglai, a spokesman for his son, director Nikita Mikhalkov. Baglai said he had no further details immediately.
The death of a man whose life and achievements embodied most of Russia's Communist era was mourned by Russian leaders and received extensive coverage on state television.
"At all times, Sergei Vladimirovich lived up to the interests of his motherland, served it and believed in it," President Dmitry Medvedev said in a statement.
In 1943, Mikhalkov, a young author and war correspondent whose poems were favored by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, was commissioned to write lyrics for a new Soviet anthem designed to inspire Red Army soldiers in the midst of World War II.
Mikhalkov's lyrics, co-written with journalist El Registan and set to music by Alexander Alexandrov, lauded Stalin who "brought us up on loyalty to the people" and "inspired us to labor and to heroism."
The anthem propelled Mikhalkov into stardom that outlived Stalin and the system he created. After the dictator's death in 1953, the anthem was mostly performed without the lyrics, but Mikhalkov remained one of the most vocal and outspoken bards of Communism.
He received numerous state awards for his children's books, film scripts, plays and fiction. He churned out adaptations of Russian and European classics -- including Mark Twain's "The Prince and the Pauper" -- transforming them according to Politburo-prescribed ideological recipes.
The King is dead, long live the King! I think there is a lot of market
for patriotical music in russia now so new generation will come for
sure.
There are today much more gifted accountants and lawyers in Russia than
music generators. THIS should really concern you.
VM
Why concern - it's for good?
Depends what reference frame you choose.
Remember when we were young - money were important but as "utility" not
some icon, ultimate measure of life.
And too many young at least in Russia today are obsessed with making
fortunes.
Reading today's Russia media you see "Putin", I see endless pursuit of
money at any price. Putin muzzled this race - to some extent, but the
beast is in no way subdued.
Quite disgusting and BORING. And people who are after money only are
dangerous, - they have no limits.
VM.
Yeah, I remember those days. Not all I dream about back then was in
reality as nice. But that's the fate of dreams. Problem you describe
is serious and not typical just to Russia. Just fascism is not answer,
Who said that fascism is the answer?
Post by vello
not solution. It's more like alcohol - giving temporary feel that
problems are beaten. There is sole medicine against that thing - real
media. Media belonging to as much owners as possible to turn them all
watchdogs for wrongdoings of other media owners, politicians, big
money. What is essential, it is belief amoung young journalists that
if they got Putin (Deripaska, Gusinsky - no matter) on photo with his
willie on some lady's mouth, it may make them superrich. Idealists are
too weak to control the society - idealists are minority forever. But
knowing that dragging black business of high official into media light
may make one rich puts 1000 times more watchdogs looking for health of
democracy and fight corruption. Their motivation is not as nice as of
idealists one - but it works as well.
Society needs to orient youngsters, today in Russia there is very little
orientation on average given except - make a buck, buy a fancy car, blah
blah blah.
Post by vello
Fascism, like all -isms are just dream. Mussolini puts trains arrive
in time - and his time was sole period mafia was totally beaten. But
as whole, Duce was unable to bring some real good to his nation.
Why you bring in fascism or Mussolini? As far as I remember neither of
the two promoted individual wealth as a life goal.
VM.
Well, my memory is weak sometimes, remember me last time Putin speech
out for individual wealth as life goal? :-) Putin is just one man,
what I say about him is about him, not about Russia or russian people.
Do you think "Nashi" movement is to rise wealth-oriented
individulaists? Do you think his foreign politics is about to tell
young russians: learn the rules, go to international market, make
fortune? Putin starts with fighting oligarhs. But not by forcing laws
equal for everyone he fights them to make them personally loyal
to ...not law but Putin. as Khodorkovsky worse/better then, say,
Abramovich or Deripaska? The same for sure. But his fate was to sit -
for show what happens to them who thinks that up there are laws, not
some person.
Putin as patriot (all dictators are patriots) fights that attitude to
make big bucks. He hates that attitude as much as Mussolini or Hitler.
I subscribe that position coz brainless money hunt is stupid by me
also. But sole way you can do it is free society and working laws.
Well there is no ideal gas or corruptionless society, but any
authoritarian state is totally corrupt - even if man on the white
horse is pure spartan idealist.
Vladimir Makarenko
2009-08-31 21:28:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by J. Anderson
Russian anthem author Mikhalkov dies at 96
AP - 27 August 2009 19:53:25 By MANSUR MIROVALEV
Sergei Mikhalkov, an author favored by Stalin who wrote the lyrics for the Soviet and Russian national anthems, persecuted dissident writers as part of the Soviet propaganda machine and fathered two noted film directors, has died at age 96.
Mikhalkov died in a Moscow hospital on Thursday, said Denis Baglai, a spokesman for his son, director Nikita Mikhalkov. Baglai said he had no further details immediately.
The death of a man whose life and achievements embodied most of Russia's Communist era was mourned by Russian leaders and received extensive coverage on state television.
"At all times, Sergei Vladimirovich lived up to the interests of his motherland, served it and believed in it," President Dmitry Medvedev said in a statement.
In 1943, Mikhalkov, a young author and war correspondent whose poems were favored by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, was commissioned to write lyrics for a new Soviet anthem designed to inspire Red Army soldiers in the midst of World War II.
Mikhalkov's lyrics, co-written with journalist El Registan and set to music by Alexander Alexandrov, lauded Stalin who "brought us up on loyalty to the people" and "inspired us to labor and to heroism."
The anthem propelled Mikhalkov into stardom that outlived Stalin and the system he created. After the dictator's death in 1953, the anthem was mostly performed without the lyrics, but Mikhalkov remained one of the most vocal and outspoken bards of Communism.
He received numerous state awards for his children's books, film scripts, plays and fiction. He churned out adaptations of Russian and European classics -- including Mark Twain's "The Prince and the Pauper" -- transforming them according to Politburo-prescribed ideological recipes.
The King is dead, long live the King! I think there is a lot of market
for patriotical music in russia now so new generation will come for
sure.
There are today much more gifted accountants and lawyers in Russia than
music generators. THIS should really concern you.
VM
Why concern - it's for good?
Depends what reference frame you choose.
Remember when we were young - money were important but as "utility" not
some icon, ultimate measure of life.
And too many young at least in Russia today are obsessed with making
fortunes.
Reading today's Russia media you see "Putin", I see endless pursuit of
money at any price. Putin muzzled this race - to some extent, but the
beast is in no way subdued.
Quite disgusting and BORING. And people who are after money only are
dangerous, - they have no limits.
VM.
Yeah, I remember those days. Not all I dream about back then was in
reality as nice. But that's the fate of dreams. Problem you describe
is serious and not typical just to Russia. Just fascism is not answer,
Who said that fascism is the answer?
Post by vello
not solution. It's more like alcohol - giving temporary feel that
problems are beaten. There is sole medicine against that thing - real
media. Media belonging to as much owners as possible to turn them all
watchdogs for wrongdoings of other media owners, politicians, big
money. What is essential, it is belief amoung young journalists that
if they got Putin (Deripaska, Gusinsky - no matter) on photo with his
willie on some lady's mouth, it may make them superrich. Idealists are
too weak to control the society - idealists are minority forever. But
knowing that dragging black business of high official into media light
may make one rich puts 1000 times more watchdogs looking for health of
democracy and fight corruption. Their motivation is not as nice as of
idealists one - but it works as well.
Society needs to orient youngsters, today in Russia there is very little
orientation on average given except - make a buck, buy a fancy car, blah
blah blah.
Post by vello
Fascism, like all -isms are just dream. Mussolini puts trains arrive
in time - and his time was sole period mafia was totally beaten. But
as whole, Duce was unable to bring some real good to his nation.
Why you bring in fascism or Mussolini? As far as I remember neither of
the two promoted individual wealth as a life goal.
VM.
Well, my memory is weak sometimes, remember me last time Putin speech
out for individual wealth as life goal? :-) Putin is just one man,
what I say about him is about him, not about Russia or russian people.
Do you think "Nashi" movement is to rise wealth-oriented
individulaists? Do you think his foreign politics is about to tell
young russians: learn the rules, go to international market, make
fortune? Putin starts with fighting oligarhs. But not by forcing laws
equal for everyone he fights them to make them personally loyal
to ...not law but Putin. as Khodorkovsky worse/better then, say,
Abramovich or Deripaska? The same for sure. But his fate was to sit -
for show what happens to them who thinks that up there are laws, not
some person.
Putin as patriot (all dictators are patriots) fights that attitude to
make big bucks. He hates that attitude as much as Mussolini or Hitler.
I subscribe that position coz brainless money hunt is stupid by me
also. But sole way you can do it is free society and working laws.
Well there is no ideal gas or corruptionless society, but any
authoritarian state is totally corrupt - even if man on the white
horse is pure spartan idealist.
In your imagination Putin is oversized and distorted to the degree I
think it leaves no room for real picture. Try to take you attention away
and look at numbers of Russia's dynamics. It will give you much more
informative overall.

VM.
Vladimir Makarenko
2009-09-01 04:46:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by J. Anderson
Russian anthem author Mikhalkov dies at 96
AP - 27 August 2009 19:53:25 By MANSUR MIROVALEV
Sergei Mikhalkov, an author favored by Stalin who wrote the lyrics for the Soviet and Russian national anthems, persecuted dissident writers as part of the Soviet propaganda machine and fathered two noted film directors, has died at age 96.
Mikhalkov died in a Moscow hospital on Thursday, said Denis Baglai, a spokesman for his son, director Nikita Mikhalkov. Baglai said he had no further details immediately.
The death of a man whose life and achievements embodied most of Russia's Communist era was mourned by Russian leaders and received extensive coverage on state television.
"At all times, Sergei Vladimirovich lived up to the interests of his motherland, served it and believed in it," President Dmitry Medvedev said in a statement.
In 1943, Mikhalkov, a young author and war correspondent whose poems were favored by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, was commissioned to write lyrics for a new Soviet anthem designed to inspire Red Army soldiers in the midst of World War II.
Mikhalkov's lyrics, co-written with journalist El Registan and set to music by Alexander Alexandrov, lauded Stalin who "brought us up on loyalty to the people" and "inspired us to labor and to heroism."
The anthem propelled Mikhalkov into stardom that outlived Stalin and the system he created. After the dictator's death in 1953, the anthem was mostly performed without the lyrics, but Mikhalkov remained one of the most vocal and outspoken bards of Communism.
He received numerous state awards for his children's books, film scripts, plays and fiction. He churned out adaptations of Russian and European classics -- including Mark Twain's "The Prince and the Pauper" -- transforming them according to Politburo-prescribed ideological recipes.
The King is dead, long live the King! I think there is a lot of market
for patriotical music in russia now so new generation will come for
sure.
There are today much more gifted accountants and lawyers in Russia than
music generators. THIS should really concern you.
VM
Why concern - it's for good?
Depends what reference frame you choose.
Remember when we were young - money were important but as "utility" not
some icon, ultimate measure of life.
And too many young at least in Russia today are obsessed with making
fortunes.
Reading today's Russia media you see "Putin", I see endless pursuit of
money at any price. Putin muzzled this race - to some extent, but the
beast is in no way subdued.
Quite disgusting and BORING. And people who are after money only are
dangerous, - they have no limits.
VM.
Yeah, I remember those days. Not all I dream about back then was in
reality as nice. But that's the fate of dreams. Problem you describe
is serious and not typical just to Russia. Just fascism is not answer,
Who said that fascism is the answer?
Post by vello
not solution. It's more like alcohol - giving temporary feel that
problems are beaten. There is sole medicine against that thing - real
media. Media belonging to as much owners as possible to turn them all
watchdogs for wrongdoings of other media owners, politicians, big
money. What is essential, it is belief amoung young journalists that
if they got Putin (Deripaska, Gusinsky - no matter) on photo with his
willie on some lady's mouth, it may make them superrich. Idealists are
too weak to control the society - idealists are minority forever. But
knowing that dragging black business of high official into media light
may make one rich puts 1000 times more watchdogs looking for health of
democracy and fight corruption. Their motivation is not as nice as of
idealists one - but it works as well.
Society needs to orient youngsters, today in Russia there is very little
orientation on average given except - make a buck, buy a fancy car, blah
blah blah.
Post by vello
Fascism, like all -isms are just dream. Mussolini puts trains arrive
in time - and his time was sole period mafia was totally beaten. But
as whole, Duce was unable to bring some real good to his nation.
Why you bring in fascism or Mussolini? As far as I remember neither of
the two promoted individual wealth as a life goal.
VM.
Well, my memory is weak sometimes, remember me last time Putin speech
out for individual wealth as life goal? :-)
??? Thanks God he hasn't.
Post by vello
Putin is just one man,
what I say about him is about him, not about Russia or russian people.
Do you think "Nashi" movement is to rise wealth-oriented
individulaists?
What else? Typical conformists in a hope to make a buck and go to Bahamas.
Post by vello
Do you think his foreign politics is about to tell
young russians: learn the rules, go to international market, make
fortune?
Absolutely - this is exactly the message.
Post by vello
Putin starts with fighting oligarhs. But not by forcing laws
equal for everyone
Because there was neither Law nor Order.
Post by vello
he fights them to make them personally loyal
to ...not law but Putin. as Khodorkovsky worse/better then, say,
Abramovich or Deripaska?
Incomparably worse. He became a threat to national security.
Post by vello
The same for sure.
It is "for sure" for you because you just merely have no idea what you
are talking about.
Post by vello
But his fate was to sit -
for show what happens to them who thinks that up there are laws, not
some person.
There was no show but surgically precise without any collateral damage
elimination of threat to national security.
Post by vello
Putin as patriot (all dictators are patriots) fights that attitude to
make big bucks.
Putin now is dictator? Oh Gosh. But the next even better - "fights that
attitude to make big bucks".
Did you check facts, - I understand that some news reach Estonia with
delay but when Putin was in office the Russian median income almost tripled.
Post by vello
He hates that attitude as much as Mussolini or Hitler.
Opps, In this message I think you mentioned these two first time. It is
an achievement.
Post by vello
I subscribe that position coz brainless money hunt is stupid by me
also. But sole way you can do it is free society and working laws.
"free society and working laws" do not fall from the skies nor are
available to import. Such aspects of society is build by society.
Post by vello
Well there is no ideal gas or corruptionless society, but any
authoritarian state is totally corrupt - even if man on the white
horse is pure spartan idealist.
That's lyrics which I am not sure in what what way related to the topic
in hand.

VM.
vello
2009-09-01 09:31:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by J. Anderson
Russian anthem author Mikhalkov dies at 96
AP - 27 August 2009 19:53:25 By MANSUR MIROVALEV
Sergei Mikhalkov, an author favored by Stalin who wrote the lyrics for the Soviet and Russian national anthems, persecuted dissident writers as part of the Soviet propaganda machine and fathered two noted film directors, has died at age 96.
Mikhalkov died in a Moscow hospital on Thursday, said Denis Baglai, a spokesman for his son, director Nikita Mikhalkov. Baglai said he had no further details immediately.
The death of a man whose life and achievements embodied most of Russia's Communist era was mourned by Russian leaders and received extensive coverage on state television.
"At all times, Sergei Vladimirovich lived up to the interests of his motherland, served it and believed in it," President Dmitry Medvedev said in a statement.
In 1943, Mikhalkov, a young author and war correspondent whose poems were favored by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, was commissioned to write lyrics for a new Soviet anthem designed to inspire Red Army soldiers in the midst of World War II.
Mikhalkov's lyrics, co-written with journalist El Registan and set to music by Alexander Alexandrov, lauded Stalin who "brought us up on loyalty to the people" and "inspired us to labor and to heroism."
The anthem propelled Mikhalkov into stardom that outlived Stalin and the system he created. After the dictator's death in 1953, the anthem was mostly performed without the lyrics, but Mikhalkov remained one of the most vocal and outspoken bards of Communism.
He received numerous state awards for his children's books, film scripts, plays and fiction. He churned out adaptations of Russian and European classics -- including Mark Twain's "The Prince and the Pauper" -- transforming them according to Politburo-prescribed ideological recipes.
The King is dead, long live the King! I think there is a lot of market
for patriotical music in russia now so new generation will come for
sure.
There are today much more gifted accountants and lawyers in Russia than
music generators. THIS should really concern you.
VM
Why concern - it's for good?
Depends what reference frame you choose.
Remember when we were young - money were important but as "utility" not
some icon, ultimate measure of life.
And too many young at least in Russia today are obsessed with making
fortunes.
Reading today's Russia media you see "Putin", I see endless pursuit of
money at any price. Putin muzzled this race - to some extent, but the
beast is in no way subdued.
Quite disgusting and BORING. And people who are after money only are
dangerous, - they have no limits.
VM.
Yeah, I remember those days. Not all I dream about back then was in
reality as nice. But that's the fate of dreams. Problem you describe
is serious and not typical just to Russia. Just fascism is not answer,
Who said that fascism is the answer?
Post by vello
not solution. It's more like alcohol - giving temporary feel that
problems are beaten. There is sole medicine against that thing - real
media. Media belonging to as much owners as possible to turn them all
watchdogs for wrongdoings of other media owners, politicians, big
money. What is essential, it is belief amoung young journalists that
if they got Putin (Deripaska, Gusinsky - no matter) on photo with his
willie on some lady's mouth, it may make them superrich. Idealists are
too weak to control the society - idealists are minority forever. But
knowing that dragging black business of high official into media light
may make one rich puts 1000 times more watchdogs looking for health of
democracy and fight corruption. Their motivation is not as nice as of
idealists one - but it works as well.
Society needs to orient youngsters, today in Russia there is very little
orientation on average given except - make a buck, buy a fancy car, blah
blah blah.
Post by vello
Fascism, like all -isms are just dream. Mussolini puts trains arrive
in time - and his time was sole period mafia was totally beaten. But
as whole, Duce was unable to bring some real good to his nation.
Why you bring in fascism or Mussolini? As far as I remember neither of
the two promoted individual wealth as a life goal.
VM.
Well, my memory is weak sometimes, remember me last time Putin speech
out for individual wealth as life goal? :-)
??? Thanks God he hasn't.
Post by vello
Putin is just one man,
what I say about him is about him, not about Russia or russian people.
Do you think "Nashi" movement is to rise wealth-oriented
individulaists?
What else? Typical conformists in a hope to make a buck and go to Bahamas.
Post by vello
Do you think his foreign politics is about to tell
young russians: learn the rules, go to international market, make
fortune?
Absolutely - this is exactly the message.
Post by vello
Putin starts with fighting oligarhs. But not by forcing laws
equal for everyone
Because there was neither Law nor Order.
Post by vello
he fights them to make them personally loyal
to ...not law but Putin. as Khodorkovsky worse/better then, say,
Abramovich or Deripaska?
Incomparably worse. He became a threat to national security.
Post by vello
The same for sure.
It is "for sure" for you because you just merely have no idea what you
are talking about.
Post by vello
But his fate was to sit -
for show what happens to them who thinks that up there are laws, not
some person.
There was no show but surgically precise without any collateral damage
elimination of threat to national security.
Post by vello
Putin as patriot (all dictators are patriots) fights that attitude to
make big bucks.
Putin now is dictator? Oh Gosh. But the next even better - "fights that
attitude to make big bucks".
Did you check facts, - I understand that some news reach Estonia with
delay but when Putin was in office the Russian median income almost tripled.
Post by vello
He hates that attitude as much as Mussolini or Hitler.
Opps, In this message I think you mentioned these two first time. It is
an achievement.
Post by vello
I subscribe that position coz brainless money hunt is stupid by me
also. But sole way you can do it is free society and working laws.
"free society and working laws" do not fall from the skies nor are
available to import. Such aspects of society is build by society.
Post by vello
Well there is no ideal gas or corruptionless society, but any
authoritarian state is totally corrupt - even if man on the white
horse is pure spartan idealist.
That's lyrics which I am not sure in what what way related to the topic
in hand.
VM.
OK, we not come to an common ground on that topic. btw, my picture of
Putin is 95% made by Russian media available to me. and no way I see
the will to build up a free country - even step by step. What I see is
gradual centralizing all power imaginable. You are fascinated about
economy numbers. Trick is, on day Putin becomes a president, oil was
15 USD barrel. Then it make a free hot air balloon flight to Putin.
Today oil is 5 times more expencive then just 9 years ago - and for
Russia such "low" price means crisis. Well managed economy by you?
Alex
2009-08-28 20:53:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by vello
Post by J. Anderson
Russian anthem author Mikhalkov dies at 96
AP - 27 August 2009 19:53:25 By MANSUR MIROVALEV
Sergei Mikhalkov, an author favored by Stalin who wrote the lyrics for the Soviet and Russian national anthems, persecuted dissident writers as part of the Soviet propaganda machine and fathered two noted film directors, has died at age 96.
Mikhalkov died in a Moscow hospital on Thursday, said Denis Baglai, a spokesman for his son, director Nikita Mikhalkov. Baglai said he had no further details immediately.
The death of a man whose life and achievements embodied most of Russia's Communist era was mourned by Russian leaders and received extensive coverage on state television.
"At all times, Sergei Vladimirovich lived up to the interests of his motherland, served it and believed in it," President Dmitry Medvedev said in a statement.
In 1943, Mikhalkov, a young author and war correspondent whose poems were favored by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, was commissioned to write lyrics for a new Soviet anthem designed to inspire Red Army soldiers in the midst of World War II.
Mikhalkov's lyrics, co-written with journalist El Registan and set to music by Alexander Alexandrov, lauded Stalin who "brought us up on loyalty to the people" and "inspired us to labor and to heroism."
The anthem propelled Mikhalkov into stardom that outlived Stalin and the system he created. After the dictator's death in 1953, the anthem was mostly performed without the lyrics, but Mikhalkov remained one of the most vocal and outspoken bards of Communism.
He received numerous state awards for his children's books, film scripts, plays and fiction. He churned out adaptations of Russian and European classics -- including Mark Twain's "The Prince and the Pauper" -- transforming them according to Politburo-prescribed ideological recipes.
The King is dead, long live the King! I think there is a lot of market
for patriotical music in russia now so new generation will come for
sure.- Скрыть цитируемый текст -
- Показать цитируемый текст -
это не потеря для русского народа, подвергавшегося инородному влиянию
разных совковых пропагандистов или инженеров человеческих душ по
сталину, наинженерили вдоволь, видим щас результаты из габоты...
русские изгои в своей стране, деградированные и исчезающие от эпидемии
чумы властной.
Dmitry
2009-08-27 18:12:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Anderson
Russian anthem author Mikhalkov dies at 96
AP - 27 August 2009 19:53:25 By MANSUR MIROVALEV
Sergei Mikhalkov, an author favored by Stalin who wrote the lyrics for the Soviet and Russian national anthems, persecuted dissident writers as part of the Soviet propaganda machine and fathered two noted film directors, has died at age 96.
Mikhalkov died in a Moscow hospital on Thursday, said Denis Baglai, a spokesman for his son, director Nikita Mikhalkov. Baglai said he had no further details immediately.
The death of a man whose life and achievements embodied most of Russia's Communist era was mourned by Russian leaders and received extensive coverage on state television.
"At all times, Sergei Vladimirovich lived up to the interests of his motherland, served it and believed in it," President Dmitry Medvedev said in a statement.
Very true statement. Propaganda and persecutions were integral parts
of his motherland's "interests".
Post by J. Anderson
In 1943, Mikhalkov, a young author and war correspondent whose poems were favored by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, was commissioned to write lyrics for a new Soviet anthem designed to inspire Red Army soldiers in the midst of World War II.
Mikhalkov's lyrics, co-written with journalist El Registan and set to music by Alexander Alexandrov, lauded Stalin who "brought us up on loyalty to the people" and "inspired us to labor and to heroism."
The anthem propelled Mikhalkov into stardom that outlived Stalin and the system he created. After the dictator's death in 1953, the anthem was mostly performed without the lyrics, but Mikhalkov remained one of the most vocal and outspoken bards of Communism.
He received numerous state awards for his children's books, film scripts, plays and fiction. He churned out adaptations of Russian and European classics -- including Mark Twain's "The Prince and the Pauper" -- transforming them according to Politburo-prescribed ideological recipes.
vello
2009-08-27 19:07:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Anderson
Russian anthem author Mikhalkov dies at 96
AP - 27 August 2009 19:53:25 By MANSUR MIROVALEV
Sergei Mikhalkov, an author favored by Stalin who wrote the lyrics for the Soviet and Russian national anthems, persecuted dissident writers as part of the Soviet propaganda machine and fathered two noted film directors, has died at age 96.
Mikhalkov died in a Moscow hospital on Thursday, said Denis Baglai, a spokesman for his son, director Nikita Mikhalkov. Baglai said he had no further details immediately.
The death of a man whose life and achievements embodied most of Russia's Communist era was mourned by Russian leaders and received extensive coverage on state television.
"At all times, Sergei Vladimirovich lived up to the interests of his motherland, served it and believed in it," President Dmitry Medvedev said in a statement.
Very true statement.  Propaganda and persecutions were integral parts
of his motherland's "interests".
Post by J. Anderson
In 1943, Mikhalkov, a young author and war correspondent whose poems were favored by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, was commissioned to write lyrics for a new Soviet anthem designed to inspire Red Army soldiers in the midst of World War II.
Mikhalkov's lyrics, co-written with journalist El Registan and set to music by Alexander Alexandrov, lauded Stalin who "brought us up on loyalty to the people" and "inspired us to labor and to heroism."
The anthem propelled Mikhalkov into stardom that outlived Stalin and the system he created. After the dictator's death in 1953, the anthem was mostly performed without the lyrics, but Mikhalkov remained one of the most vocal and outspoken bards of Communism.
He received numerous state awards for his children's books, film scripts, plays and fiction. He churned out adaptations of Russian and European classics -- including Mark Twain's "The Prince and the Pauper" -- transforming them according to Politburo-prescribed ideological recipes.- Hide quoted text -
I have no idea was he truebeliever or just opportunist, but it is sad
that far right/left political movements have often succeeded to
attract very gifted people.
Dmitry
2009-08-27 21:39:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by vello
I have no idea was he truebeliever or just opportunist, but it is sad
that far right/left political movements have often succeeded to
attract very gifted people.
It was almost impossible to survive in a "creative world" without
showing the loyality to the regime in Stalin's era, but I think those
who climbed up the political ladder were also opportunists. Far right/
left regimes, instead of attracting gifted people, create the
situation when the art becomes part of the repressive system.
vello
2009-08-27 22:17:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dmitry
Post by vello
I have no idea was he truebeliever or just opportunist, but it is sad
that far right/left political movements have often succeeded to
attract very gifted people.
It was almost impossible to survive in a "creative world" without
showing the loyality to the regime in Stalin's era, but I think those
who climbed up the political ladder were also opportunists.  Far right/
left regimes, instead of attracting gifted people, create the
situation when the art becomes part of the repressive system.
Well, last one is by me not about gifted ones but about agitprop
clerks :-). But think Leni Riefenstahl - and Russia in twenties with
plenty of names.
Vladimir Makarenko
2009-08-28 02:31:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by vello
Post by Dmitry
Post by vello
I have no idea was he truebeliever or just opportunist, but it is sad
that far right/left political movements have often succeeded to
attract very gifted people.
It was almost impossible to survive in a "creative world" without
showing the loyality to the regime in Stalin's era, but I think those
who climbed up the political ladder were also opportunists. Far right/
left regimes, instead of attracting gifted people, create the
situation when the art becomes part of the repressive system.
Well, last one is by me not about gifted ones but about agitprop
clerks :-). But think Leni Riefenstahl - and Russia in twenties with
plenty of names.
This one is astonishing - you really compare Russia's chaotic art
explosion of twenties with a Nazi Germany imperial agitprop masterpiece?
Make me wonder if we live on the same planet...
Is it another Mart Laar "idea"?

VM.
vello
2009-08-28 08:36:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Dmitry
Post by vello
I have no idea was he truebeliever or just opportunist, but it is sad
that far right/left political movements have often succeeded to
attract very gifted people.
It was almost impossible to survive in a "creative world" without
showing the loyality to the regime in Stalin's era, but I think those
who climbed up the political ladder were also opportunists.  Far right/
left regimes, instead of attracting gifted people, create the
situation when the art becomes part of the repressive system.
Well, last one is by me not about gifted ones but about agitprop
clerks :-). But think Leni Riefenstahl - and Russia in twenties with
plenty of names.
This one is astonishing - you really compare Russia's chaotic art
explosion of twenties with a Nazi Germany imperial agitprop masterpiece?
Make me wonder if we live on the same planet...
Is it another Mart Laar "idea"?
VM.
Riefenstahl is one geniuses of all time cinema history. He was
truebeliever thinking that first time in history Hitler succeeded in
uniting germans as one family - supporting each other, fighting for
the same target. It was long before war and gas chambers. You can't
command or manipulate art of such level - and no one is able to
produce such things by order or for money. Compare Russian "art
explosion" of twenties with the latter "socialist realism" - first
guys think they are eyewitnesses (and part of) of a new righteous and
brave world rising, latters think they get money, medals and western
jeans for producing any bullshit illiteral party leaders may want.
J. Anderson
2009-08-28 09:10:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Dmitry
Post by vello
I have no idea was he truebeliever or just opportunist, but it is sad
that far right/left political movements have often succeeded to
attract very gifted people.
It was almost impossible to survive in a "creative world" without
showing the loyality to the regime in Stalin's era, but I think those
who climbed up the political ladder were also opportunists. Far right/
left regimes, instead of attracting gifted people, create the
situation when the art becomes part of the repressive system.
Well, last one is by me not about gifted ones but about agitprop
clerks :-). But think Leni Riefenstahl - and Russia in twenties with
plenty of names.
This one is astonishing - you really compare Russia's chaotic art
explosion of twenties with a Nazi Germany imperial agitprop masterpiece?
Make me wonder if we live on the same planet...
Is it another Mart Laar "idea"?
VM.
Riefenstahl is one geniuses of all time cinema history. He was
truebeliever thinking that first time in history Hitler succeeded in
uniting germans as one family - supporting each other, fighting for
the same target. It was long before war and gas chambers. You can't
command or manipulate art of such level - and no one is able to
produce such things by order or for money. Compare Russian "art
explosion" of twenties with the latter "socialist realism" - first
guys think they are eyewitnesses (and part of) of a new righteous and
brave world rising, latters think they get money, medals and western
jeans for producing any bullshit illiteral party leaders may want.
Besides, if you take her first name, Leni, and put it into the genitive
form in Finnish, it becomes Lenin.

Another proof of how close the totalitarian ideologies are to each other!
Vladimir Makarenko
2009-08-28 16:14:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Dmitry
Post by vello
I have no idea was he truebeliever or just opportunist, but it is sad
that far right/left political movements have often succeeded to
attract very gifted people.
It was almost impossible to survive in a "creative world" without
showing the loyality to the regime in Stalin's era, but I think those
who climbed up the political ladder were also opportunists. Far right/
left regimes, instead of attracting gifted people, create the
situation when the art becomes part of the repressive system.
Well, last one is by me not about gifted ones but about agitprop
clerks :-). But think Leni Riefenstahl - and Russia in twenties with
plenty of names.
This one is astonishing - you really compare Russia's chaotic art
explosion of twenties with a Nazi Germany imperial agitprop masterpiece?
Make me wonder if we live on the same planet...
Is it another Mart Laar "idea"?
VM.
Riefenstahl is one geniuses of all time cinema history. He was
truebeliever thinking that first time in history Hitler succeeded in
uniting germans as one family - supporting each other, fighting for
the same target. It was long before war and gas chambers. You can't
command or manipulate art of such level - and no one is able to
produce such things by order or for money. Compare Russian "art
explosion" of twenties with the latter "socialist realism" - first
guys think they are eyewitnesses (and part of) of a new righteous and
brave world rising, latters think they get money, medals and western
jeans for producing any bullshit illiteral party leaders may want.
Russian art of twenties had little in common with communist ideology,
rather it had roots in futurism. It was in the time Communism which was
borrowing from the art not the other way.
My personal preferences are with architecture and this brings cross
point with Germany - Bauhaus. In the time there were only two brain
centers for this art - Russia and Germany, they defined the ways of
future development. Figuratively speaking Tatlin+Gropius = Le Corbusier.
Do you know Moscow has his building? (I really don't like his
architecture, he took the ideas to dead end extremism).

VM.
Dmitry
2009-08-28 17:26:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Dmitry
Post by vello
I have no idea was he truebeliever or just opportunist, but it is sad
that far right/left political movements have often succeeded to
attract very gifted people.
It was almost impossible to survive in a "creative world" without
showing the loyality to the regime in Stalin's era, but I think those
who climbed up the political ladder were also opportunists.  Far right/
left regimes, instead of attracting gifted people, create the
situation when the art becomes part of the repressive system.
Well, last one is by me not about gifted ones but about agitprop
clerks :-). But think Leni Riefenstahl - and Russia in twenties with
plenty of names.
This one is astonishing - you really compare Russia's chaotic art
explosion of twenties with a Nazi Germany imperial agitprop masterpiece?
Make me wonder if we live on the same planet...
Is it another Mart Laar "idea"?
VM.
Riefenstahl is one geniuses of all time cinema history. He was
truebeliever thinking that first time in history Hitler succeeded in
uniting germans as one family - supporting each other, fighting for
the same target. It was long before war and gas chambers. You can't
command or manipulate art of such level - and no one is able to
produce such things by order or for money. Compare Russian "art
explosion" of twenties with the latter "socialist realism" - first
guys think they are eyewitnesses (and part of) of a new righteous and
brave  world rising, latters think they get money, medals and western
jeans for producing any bullshit illiteral party leaders may want.
Russian art of twenties had little in common with communist ideology,
rather it had roots in futurism. It was in the time Communism which was
borrowing from the art not the other way.
There are amazing pieces for sale http://www.iconastas.co.uk/stock.asp?Cat=3
Fancy this http://www.iconastas.co.uk/stock.asp?code=453055989 for
£8750?
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
My personal preferences are with architecture and this brings cross
point with Germany - Bauhaus. In the time there were only two brain
centers for this art - Russia and Germany, they defined the ways of
future development. Figuratively speaking Tatlin+Gropius = Le Corbusier.
Do you know Moscow has his building? (I really don't like his
architecture, he took the ideas to dead end extremism).
VM.
vello
2009-08-31 14:21:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Dmitry
Post by vello
I have no idea was he truebeliever or just opportunist, but it is sad
that far right/left political movements have often succeeded to
attract very gifted people.
It was almost impossible to survive in a "creative world" without
showing the loyality to the regime in Stalin's era, but I think those
who climbed up the political ladder were also opportunists.  Far right/
left regimes, instead of attracting gifted people, create the
situation when the art becomes part of the repressive system.
Well, last one is by me not about gifted ones but about agitprop
clerks :-). But think Leni Riefenstahl - and Russia in twenties with
plenty of names.
This one is astonishing - you really compare Russia's chaotic art
explosion of twenties with a Nazi Germany imperial agitprop masterpiece?
Make me wonder if we live on the same planet...
Is it another Mart Laar "idea"?
VM.
Riefenstahl is one geniuses of all time cinema history. He was
truebeliever thinking that first time in history Hitler succeeded in
uniting germans as one family - supporting each other, fighting for
the same target. It was long before war and gas chambers. You can't
command or manipulate art of such level - and no one is able to
produce such things by order or for money. Compare Russian "art
explosion" of twenties with the latter "socialist realism" - first
guys think they are eyewitnesses (and part of) of a new righteous and
brave  world rising, latters think they get money, medals and western
jeans for producing any bullshit illiteral party leaders may want.
Russian art of twenties had little in common with communist ideology,
rather it had roots in futurism. It was in the time Communism which was
borrowing from the art not the other way.
My personal preferences are with architecture and this brings cross
point with Germany - Bauhaus. In the time there were only two brain
centers for this art - Russia and Germany, they defined the ways of
future development. Figuratively speaking Tatlin+Gropius = Le Corbusier.
Do you know Moscow has his building? (I really don't like his
architecture, he took the ideas to dead end extremism).
VM.- Hide quoted text -
You are correct, they both were the apples from the same apple tree:
from apple tree of fascism/communism. Well, as being real artists, not
agitprop workers, they don't fit into real, not imagined red/brown
state - real artists are independent, nor Lenin-Stalin, nor Hitler
wants them. But they formed ideology and appearance of the latter
soviet-nazi buildings and projects. For them, the world was arena for
their imagination, people - just ants walking somewhere inside their
grandiose buildings/monuments.
If you want to see the last victorious battle of fascists of
architecture, go to Paris. La Defence is fantastic modern day
pyramide, gorgeous - and pointless.
In some other context there is a term: "voting by legs". Well, it
works for our case also perfectly. If you want to see crowds, go to
medieval city centers with 5 by 5 meter houses and small coffees.
There one feels himseld as human, not as insect looking at Babylon
tower.
Vladimir Makarenko
2009-08-31 19:39:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Dmitry
Post by vello
I have no idea was he truebeliever or just opportunist, but it is sad
that far right/left political movements have often succeeded to
attract very gifted people.
It was almost impossible to survive in a "creative world" without
showing the loyality to the regime in Stalin's era, but I think those
who climbed up the political ladder were also opportunists. Far right/
left regimes, instead of attracting gifted people, create the
situation when the art becomes part of the repressive system.
Well, last one is by me not about gifted ones but about agitprop
clerks :-). But think Leni Riefenstahl - and Russia in twenties with
plenty of names.
This one is astonishing - you really compare Russia's chaotic art
explosion of twenties with a Nazi Germany imperial agitprop masterpiece?
Make me wonder if we live on the same planet...
Is it another Mart Laar "idea"?
VM.
Riefenstahl is one geniuses of all time cinema history. He was
truebeliever thinking that first time in history Hitler succeeded in
uniting germans as one family - supporting each other, fighting for
the same target. It was long before war and gas chambers. You can't
command or manipulate art of such level - and no one is able to
produce such things by order or for money. Compare Russian "art
explosion" of twenties with the latter "socialist realism" - first
guys think they are eyewitnesses (and part of) of a new righteous and
brave world rising, latters think they get money, medals and western
jeans for producing any bullshit illiteral party leaders may want.
Russian art of twenties had little in common with communist ideology,
rather it had roots in futurism. It was in the time Communism which was
borrowing from the art not the other way.
My personal preferences are with architecture and this brings cross
point with Germany - Bauhaus. In the time there were only two brain
centers for this art - Russia and Germany, they defined the ways of
future development. Figuratively speaking Tatlin+Gropius = Le Corbusier.
Do you know Moscow has his building? (I really don't like his
architecture, he took the ideas to dead end extremism).
VM.- Hide quoted text -
from apple tree of fascism/communism.
Hm, in Germany in the time there was the Weimar Republic and it is a
fantasy to put it mildly to connect Bauhaus with Nazi ideology in any
aspect.
The same mostly true for artists in Russia in the time the "romantic"
Communism of the period didn't "draft" artists or imposed any
restrictions. All the masterpieces of Constructivism were created in
20-ties.
Post by vello
Well, as being real artists, not
agitprop workers, they don't fit into real, not imagined red/brown
state - real artists are independent, nor Lenin-Stalin, nor Hitler
wants them. But they formed ideology and appearance of the latter
soviet-nazi buildings and projects. For them, the world was arena for
their imagination, people - just ants walking somewhere inside their
grandiose buildings/monuments.
If you want to see the last victorious battle of fascists of
architecture, go to Paris. La Defence is fantastic modern day
pyramide, gorgeous - and pointless.
Well, I would not refer to it in precise ideological terms - usually
such buildings are reflection of how much desire was there to
demonstrate sheer power. It was about "Grandeur", Super Ego, while
ideologies could be quite opposite. On my first time in London I was
amused how much its imperial architecture are similar to St Petersburg.
Or have you been to Washington? Look at quite a few federal buildings
there, monstrous pseudo classicism. Now it is partly moved to Asia and
corporations - this who today makes huge buildings, but at least
sometimes these building are piece of art despite being huge.
Post by vello
In some other context there is a term: "voting by legs". Well, it
works for our case also perfectly. If you want to see crowds, go to
medieval city centers with 5 by 5 meter houses and small coffees.
There one feels himseld as human, not as insect looking at Babylon
tower.
Well, this is where I would definitely go - small coffee shop but let's
not fool ourselves: maybe even bigger number are going happily to sports
or pop culture events which assemble tens sometimes hundreds of thousands.

VM.
vello
2009-08-31 20:02:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Dmitry
Post by vello
I have no idea was he truebeliever or just opportunist, but it is sad
that far right/left political movements have often succeeded to
attract very gifted people.
It was almost impossible to survive in a "creative world" without
showing the loyality to the regime in Stalin's era, but I think those
who climbed up the political ladder were also opportunists.  Far right/
left regimes, instead of attracting gifted people, create the
situation when the art becomes part of the repressive system.
Well, last one is by me not about gifted ones but about agitprop
clerks :-). But think Leni Riefenstahl - and Russia in twenties with
plenty of names.
This one is astonishing - you really compare Russia's chaotic art
explosion of twenties with a Nazi Germany imperial agitprop masterpiece?
Make me wonder if we live on the same planet...
Is it another Mart Laar "idea"?
VM.
Riefenstahl is one geniuses of all time cinema history. He was
truebeliever thinking that first time in history Hitler succeeded in
uniting germans as one family - supporting each other, fighting for
the same target. It was long before war and gas chambers. You can't
command or manipulate art of such level - and no one is able to
produce such things by order or for money. Compare Russian "art
explosion" of twenties with the latter "socialist realism" - first
guys think they are eyewitnesses (and part of) of a new righteous and
brave  world rising, latters think they get money, medals and western
jeans for producing any bullshit illiteral party leaders may want.
Russian art of twenties had little in common with communist ideology,
rather it had roots in futurism. It was in the time Communism which was
borrowing from the art not the other way.
My personal preferences are with architecture and this brings cross
point with Germany - Bauhaus. In the time there were only two brain
centers for this art - Russia and Germany, they defined the ways of
future development. Figuratively speaking Tatlin+Gropius = Le Corbusier.
Do you know Moscow has his building? (I really don't like his
architecture, he took the ideas to dead end extremism).
VM.- Hide quoted text -
from apple tree of fascism/communism.
Hm, in Germany in the time there was the Weimar Republic and it is a
fantasy to put it mildly to connect Bauhaus with Nazi ideology in any
aspect.
The same mostly true for artists in Russia in the time the "romantic"
Communism of the period didn't "draft" artists or imposed any
restrictions. All the masterpieces of Constructivism were created in
20-ties.
That is exactly what I'm talking - in "real" socialist/fascist state
independent dreaming was out of question. But they carry the same
dream about future: great society, great nation, great houses up to
the skies ...and small-small persons somewhere on the lower end of
canvas, mostly painted as mass moving in one direction, not as
individuals with their own dreams and destinies.
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Well, as being real artists, not
agitprop workers, they don't fit into real, not imagined red/brown
state - real artists are independent, nor Lenin-Stalin, nor Hitler
wants them. But they formed ideology and appearance of the latter
soviet-nazi buildings and projects. For them, the world was arena for
their imagination, people - just ants walking somewhere inside their
grandiose buildings/monuments.
If you want to see the last victorious battle of fascists of
architecture, go to Paris. La Defence is fantastic modern day
pyramide, gorgeous - and pointless.
Well, I would not refer to it in precise ideological terms - usually
such buildings are reflection of how much desire was there to
demonstrate sheer power. It was about "Grandeur", Super Ego, while
ideologies could be quite opposite.
It was OK till it was in accordance with society - take Louvre or
Winter Palace, they were erected to show grandeur of a single person -
king - and a nation as property of that king.

On my first time in London I was
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
amused how much its imperial architecture are similar to St Petersburg.
Or have you been to Washington? Look at quite a few federal buildings
there, monstrous pseudo classicism. Now it is partly moved to Asia and
corporations - this who today makes huge buildings, but at least
sometimes these building are piece of art despite being huge.
They are often nice as pieces of art. But never as living environment.
Coz they were not built for that purpose.
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
In some other context there is a term: "voting by legs". Well, it
works for our case also perfectly. If you want to see crowds, go to
medieval city centers with 5 by 5 meter houses and small coffees.
There one feels himseld as human, not as insect looking at Babylon
tower.
Well, this is where I would definitely go - small coffee shop but let's
not fool ourselves: maybe even bigger number are going happily to sports
or pop culture events which assemble tens sometimes hundreds of thousands.
Well, they go for particular show, not for environment :-)
Vladimir Makarenko
2009-09-07 06:05:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Dmitry
Post by vello
I have no idea was he truebeliever or just opportunist, but it is sad
that far right/left political movements have often succeeded to
attract very gifted people.
It was almost impossible to survive in a "creative world" without
showing the loyality to the regime in Stalin's era, but I think those
who climbed up the political ladder were also opportunists. Far right/
left regimes, instead of attracting gifted people, create the
situation when the art becomes part of the repressive system.
Well, last one is by me not about gifted ones but about agitprop
clerks :-). But think Leni Riefenstahl - and Russia in twenties with
plenty of names.
This one is astonishing - you really compare Russia's chaotic art
explosion of twenties with a Nazi Germany imperial agitprop masterpiece?
Make me wonder if we live on the same planet...
Is it another Mart Laar "idea"?
VM.
Riefenstahl is one geniuses of all time cinema history. He was
truebeliever thinking that first time in history Hitler succeeded in
uniting germans as one family - supporting each other, fighting for
the same target. It was long before war and gas chambers. You can't
command or manipulate art of such level - and no one is able to
produce such things by order or for money. Compare Russian "art
explosion" of twenties with the latter "socialist realism" - first
guys think they are eyewitnesses (and part of) of a new righteous and
brave world rising, latters think they get money, medals and western
jeans for producing any bullshit illiteral party leaders may want.
Russian art of twenties had little in common with communist ideology,
rather it had roots in futurism. It was in the time Communism which was
borrowing from the art not the other way.
My personal preferences are with architecture and this brings cross
point with Germany - Bauhaus. In the time there were only two brain
centers for this art - Russia and Germany, they defined the ways of
future development. Figuratively speaking Tatlin+Gropius = Le Corbusier.
Do you know Moscow has his building? (I really don't like his
architecture, he took the ideas to dead end extremism).
VM.
For the case you happen to go to Moscow - I recovered in my memory the
names and routes - today it is "Chistye Prudy" underground station, ex
"Kirova". You get on the surface you go down (literally) Myasnickaya
(today) street, previously "Kirova" street, two or three blocks down
there is a building (maybe nine -twelve stores) looking average of
1970-ties. It is the Le Corbusier.
http://www.galinsky.com/buildings/tsentrosoyuz/index.html
http://www.bubbleshare.com/album/59070/overview

VM.
Tadas Blinda
2009-09-07 09:55:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
today it is "Chistye Prudy"
There are no Чистие Пруди
Vladimir Makarenko
2009-09-07 16:14:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
today it is "Chistye Prudy"
There are no Чистие Пруди in Moscow, Only грязные пруды.
After I become a president of Latvia I order my super secret services to
kidnap you and then I ER you to Uganda. Until you confess and apologize
what will be broadcasted again and again on Baltic TV. And because there
in Uganda they will commit some barbarian ritual on you I will appoint
you a head of Latvian Italian Opera.

VM.
Vladimir Makarenko
2009-09-07 16:16:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
today it is "Chistye Prudy"
There are no Чистие Пруди in Moscow, Only грязные пруды.
And of course there is also my favorite - Patriarshi Prudy.

VM.
Dmitry
2009-09-07 19:04:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
today it is "Chistye Prudy"
There are no þÉÓÔÉÅ ðÒÕÄÉ in Moscow,  Only ÇÒÑÚÎÙÅ ÐÒÕÄÙ.
And of course there is also my favorite - Patriarshi Prudy.
VM.
Is that where Woland met Berlioz and Bezdomny?
Dmitry
2009-09-07 19:21:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
today it is "Chistye Prudy"
There are no Чистие Пруди in Moscow,  Only грязные пруды.
Neither Black Sea is black. You should at least note that the name
"Kirova" was scrapped.

vello
2009-09-07 12:29:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Dmitry
Post by vello
I have no idea was he truebeliever or just opportunist, but it is sad
that far right/left political movements have often succeeded to
attract very gifted people.
It was almost impossible to survive in a "creative world" without
showing the loyality to the regime in Stalin's era, but I think those
who climbed up the political ladder were also opportunists.  Far right/
left regimes, instead of attracting gifted people, create the
situation when the art becomes part of the repressive system.
Well, last one is by me not about gifted ones but about agitprop
clerks :-). But think Leni Riefenstahl - and Russia in twenties with
plenty of names.
This one is astonishing - you really compare Russia's chaotic art
explosion of twenties with a Nazi Germany imperial agitprop masterpiece?
Make me wonder if we live on the same planet...
Is it another Mart Laar "idea"?
VM.
Riefenstahl is one geniuses of all time cinema history. He was
truebeliever thinking that first time in history Hitler succeeded in
uniting germans as one family - supporting each other, fighting for
the same target. It was long before war and gas chambers. You can't
command or manipulate art of such level - and no one is able to
produce such things by order or for money. Compare Russian "art
explosion" of twenties with the latter "socialist realism" - first
guys think they are eyewitnesses (and part of) of a new righteous and
brave  world rising, latters think they get money, medals and western
jeans for producing any bullshit illiteral party leaders may want.
Russian art of twenties had little in common with communist ideology,
rather it had roots in futurism. It was in the time Communism which was
borrowing from the art not the other way.
My personal preferences are with architecture and this brings cross
point with Germany - Bauhaus. In the time there were only two brain
centers for this art - Russia and Germany, they defined the ways of
future development. Figuratively speaking Tatlin+Gropius = Le Corbusier.
Do you know Moscow has his building? (I really don't like his
architecture, he took the ideas to dead end extremism).
VM.
For the case you happen to go to Moscow - I recovered in my memory the
names and routes - today it is "Chistye Prudy" underground station, ex
"Kirova". You get on the surface you go down (literally) Myasnickaya
(today) street, previously "Kirova" street, two or three blocks down
there is a building (maybe nine -twelve stores) looking average of
1970-ties. It is the Le Corbusier.http://www.galinsky.com/buildings/tsentrosoyuz/index.htmlhttp://www.bubbleshare.com/album/59070/overview
VM
Thank you, i know that building - I went to look at it when I was
student (in eighties). I remember was a bit disappointed, coz it was
in someway wery similar to buildings of that period in SU - but what
you ask from an old fascist like he was :-)

My key to fascism:
a) people first, ideas, buildings etc latter - normal life
b) buildings, ideas, art, achievements first, people must fit them,
not vice versa - fascism. well, surely ideas must be ahead of
buildings in that list.
J. Anderson
2009-08-28 06:54:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by vello
Well, last one is by me not about gifted ones but about agitprop
clerks :-). But think Leni Riefenstahl - and Russia in twenties with
plenty of names.
Please don't mention Sergey Eizenshteyn (?????? ?????????? ??????????).
Someone might remember that he was from Riga, and Latvia will again get the
blame for creating the Soviet Union.
Dmitry
2009-08-28 17:00:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Anderson
Please don't mention Sergey Eizenshteyn (?????? ?????????? ??????????).
Someone might remember that he was from Riga, and Latvia will again get the
blame for creating the Soviet Union.
You have to blame someone. Blaming Zionists is old-fassioned - why
not Latvia?
J. Anderson
2009-08-28 18:09:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dmitry
Post by J. Anderson
Please don't mention Sergey Eizenshteyn (?????? ?????????? ??????????).
Someone might remember that he was from Riga, and Latvia will again get the
blame for creating the Soviet Union.
You have to blame someone. Blaming Zionists is old-fassioned - why
not Latvia?
How about this solution:

Dmitry
2009-08-28 20:35:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Anderson
Please don't mention Sergey Eizenshteyn (?????? ?????????? ??????????).
Someone might remember that he was from Riga, and Latvia will again get the
blame for creating the Soviet Union.
You have to blame someone.  Blaming Zionists is old-fassioned - why
not Latvia?
How about this http://youtu.be/TIGwKUqbTGc
I wuld blame the sound of that recorder/whistle "lead break" in the
middle. If you loop it and put it on radio in all factories, workers
will start be interested in joining revolutions. Lenin was very
clever making it all happen without the technology-))
Vladimir Makarenko
2009-08-28 02:19:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by vello
Post by Dmitry
Post by J. Anderson
Russian anthem author Mikhalkov dies at 96
AP - 27 August 2009 19:53:25 By MANSUR MIROVALEV
Sergei Mikhalkov, an author favored by Stalin who wrote the lyrics for the Soviet and Russian national anthems, persecuted dissident writers as part of the Soviet propaganda machine and fathered two noted film directors, has died at age 96.
Mikhalkov died in a Moscow hospital on Thursday, said Denis Baglai, a spokesman for his son, director Nikita Mikhalkov. Baglai said he had no further details immediately.
The death of a man whose life and achievements embodied most of Russia's Communist era was mourned by Russian leaders and received extensive coverage on state television.
"At all times, Sergei Vladimirovich lived up to the interests of his motherland, served it and believed in it," President Dmitry Medvedev said in a statement.
Very true statement. Propaganda and persecutions were integral parts
of his motherland's "interests".
Post by J. Anderson
In 1943, Mikhalkov, a young author and war correspondent whose poems were favored by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, was commissioned to write lyrics for a new Soviet anthem designed to inspire Red Army soldiers in the midst of World War II.
Mikhalkov's lyrics, co-written with journalist El Registan and set to music by Alexander Alexandrov, lauded Stalin who "brought us up on loyalty to the people" and "inspired us to labor and to heroism."
The anthem propelled Mikhalkov into stardom that outlived Stalin and the system he created. After the dictator's death in 1953, the anthem was mostly performed without the lyrics, but Mikhalkov remained one of the most vocal and outspoken bards of Communism.
He received numerous state awards for his children's books, film scripts, plays and fiction. He churned out adaptations of Russian and European classics -- including Mark Twain's "The Prince and the Pauper" -- transforming them according to Politburo-prescribed ideological recipes.- Hide quoted text -
I have no idea was he truebeliever or just opportunist, but it is sad
that far right/left political movements have often succeeded to
attract very gifted people.
And why would it happened?

VM.
vello
2009-08-31 14:24:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by J. Anderson
Russian anthem author Mikhalkov dies at 96
AP - 27 August 2009 19:53:25 By MANSUR MIROVALEV
Sergei Mikhalkov, an author favored by Stalin who wrote the lyrics for the Soviet and Russian national anthems, persecuted dissident writers as part of the Soviet propaganda machine and fathered two noted film directors, has died at age 96.
Mikhalkov died in a Moscow hospital on Thursday, said Denis Baglai, a spokesman for his son, director Nikita Mikhalkov. Baglai said he had no further details immediately.
The death of a man whose life and achievements embodied most of Russia's Communist era was mourned by Russian leaders and received extensive coverage on state television.
"At all times, Sergei Vladimirovich lived up to the interests of his motherland, served it and believed in it," President Dmitry Medvedev said in a statement.
Very true statement.  Propaganda and persecutions were integral parts
of his motherland's "interests".
Post by J. Anderson
In 1943, Mikhalkov, a young author and war correspondent whose poems were favored by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, was commissioned to write lyrics for a new Soviet anthem designed to inspire Red Army soldiers in the midst of World War II.
Mikhalkov's lyrics, co-written with journalist El Registan and set to music by Alexander Alexandrov, lauded Stalin who "brought us up on loyalty to the people" and "inspired us to labor and to heroism."
The anthem propelled Mikhalkov into stardom that outlived Stalin and the system he created. After the dictator's death in 1953, the anthem was mostly performed without the lyrics, but Mikhalkov remained one of the most vocal and outspoken bards of Communism.
He received numerous state awards for his children's books, film scripts, plays and fiction. He churned out adaptations of Russian and European classics -- including Mark Twain's "The Prince and the Pauper" -- transforming them according to Politburo-prescribed ideological recipes.- Hide quoted text -
I have no idea was he truebeliever or just opportunist, but it is sad
that far right/left political movements have often succeeded to
attract very gifted people.
And why would it happened?
VM.
A man on a white horse showing with sword tip the way to the future
without diseases, fears, unhappiness is surely more attractive to
emotional artist's soul then politician declaring that rising or
cutting taxes by 0,78% will probably cut unemployment by 0,56%
Vladimir Makarenko
2009-08-31 19:41:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by vello
Post by Vladimir Makarenko
Post by vello
Post by Dmitry
Post by J. Anderson
Russian anthem author Mikhalkov dies at 96
AP - 27 August 2009 19:53:25 By MANSUR MIROVALEV
Sergei Mikhalkov, an author favored by Stalin who wrote the lyrics for the Soviet and Russian national anthems, persecuted dissident writers as part of the Soviet propaganda machine and fathered two noted film directors, has died at age 96.
Mikhalkov died in a Moscow hospital on Thursday, said Denis Baglai, a spokesman for his son, director Nikita Mikhalkov. Baglai said he had no further details immediately.
The death of a man whose life and achievements embodied most of Russia's Communist era was mourned by Russian leaders and received extensive coverage on state television.
"At all times, Sergei Vladimirovich lived up to the interests of his motherland, served it and believed in it," President Dmitry Medvedev said in a statement.
Very true statement. Propaganda and persecutions were integral parts
of his motherland's "interests".
Post by J. Anderson
In 1943, Mikhalkov, a young author and war correspondent whose poems were favored by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, was commissioned to write lyrics for a new Soviet anthem designed to inspire Red Army soldiers in the midst of World War II.
Mikhalkov's lyrics, co-written with journalist El Registan and set to music by Alexander Alexandrov, lauded Stalin who "brought us up on loyalty to the people" and "inspired us to labor and to heroism."
The anthem propelled Mikhalkov into stardom that outlived Stalin and the system he created. After the dictator's death in 1953, the anthem was mostly performed without the lyrics, but Mikhalkov remained one of the most vocal and outspoken bards of Communism.
He received numerous state awards for his children's books, film scripts, plays and fiction. He churned out adaptations of Russian and European classics -- including Mark Twain's "The Prince and the Pauper" -- transforming them according to Politburo-prescribed ideological recipes.- Hide quoted text -
I have no idea was he truebeliever or just opportunist, but it is sad
that far right/left political movements have often succeeded to
attract very gifted people.
And why would it happened?
VM.
A man on a white horse showing with sword tip the way to the future
without diseases, fears, unhappiness is surely more attractive to
emotional artist's soul then politician declaring that rising or
cutting taxes by 0,78% will probably cut unemployment by 0,56%
I am not so sure about that. Look at American literature of the
beginning of XX cent., from Jack London to Dreiser.

VM.
Vladimir Makarenko
2009-08-28 01:20:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Anderson
Russian anthem author Mikhalkov dies at 96
/AP - 27 August 2009 19:53:25 By MANSUR MIROVALEV /
Sergei Mikhalkov, an author favored by Stalin who wrote the lyrics for
the Soviet and Russian national anthems, persecuted dissident writers as
part of the Soviet propaganda machine and fathered two noted film
directors, has died at age 96.
Mikhalkov died in a Moscow hospital on Thursday, said Denis Baglai, a
spokesman for his son, director Nikita Mikhalkov. Baglai said he had no
further details immediately.
The death of a man whose life and achievements embodied most of Russia's
Communist era was mourned by Russian leaders and received extensive
coverage on state television.
"At all times, Sergei Vladimirovich lived up to the interests of his
motherland, served it and believed in it," President Dmitry Medvedev
said in a statement.
In 1943, Mikhalkov, a young author and war correspondent whose poems
were favored by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, was commissioned to write
lyrics for a new Soviet anthem designed to inspire Red Army soldiers in
the midst of World War II.
Mikhalkov's lyrics, co-written with journalist El Registan and set to
music by Alexander Alexandrov, lauded Stalin who "brought us up on
loyalty to the people" and "inspired us to labor and to heroism."
The anthem propelled Mikhalkov into stardom that outlived Stalin and the
system he created. After the dictator's death in 1953, the anthem was
mostly performed without the lyrics, but Mikhalkov remained one of the
most vocal and outspoken bards of Communism.
He received numerous state awards for his children's books, film
scripts, plays and fiction. He churned out adaptations of Russian and
European classics -- including Mark Twain's "The Prince and the Pauper"
-- transforming them according to Politburo-prescribed ideological recipes.
At least for my generation he was nobody - a madam Tussauds figure. His
two sons Nikita and Andrei is a different story. Both very gifted but
Andrei is a selfish whore and Nikita despite all his rough edges (meet
him in the street and you decide he is a gangster - seriously) is a real
artist.
Alex
2009-08-28 20:46:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Anderson
Russian anthem author Mikhalkov dies at 96
AP - 27 August 2009 19:53:25 By MANSUR MIROVALEV
Sergei Mikhalkov, an author favored by Stalin who wrote the lyrics for the Soviet and Russian national anthems, persecuted dissident writers as part of the Soviet propaganda machine and fathered two noted film directors, has died at age 96.
Mikhalkov died in a Moscow hospital on Thursday, said Denis Baglai, a spokesman for his son, director Nikita Mikhalkov. Baglai said he had no further details immediately.
The death of a man whose life and achievements embodied most of Russia's Communist era was mourned by Russian leaders and received extensive coverage on state television.
"At all times, Sergei Vladimirovich lived up to the interests of his motherland, served it and believed in it," President Dmitry Medvedev said in a statement.
In 1943, Mikhalkov, a young author and war correspondent whose poems were favored by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, was commissioned to write lyrics for a new Soviet anthem designed to inspire Red Army soldiers in the midst of World War II.
Mikhalkov's lyrics, co-written with journalist El Registan and set to music by Alexander Alexandrov, lauded Stalin who "brought us up on loyalty to the people" and "inspired us to labor and to heroism."
The anthem propelled Mikhalkov into stardom that outlived Stalin and the system he created. After the dictator's death in 1953, the anthem was mostly performed without the lyrics, but Mikhalkov remained one of the most vocal and outspoken bards of Communism.
He received numerous state awards for his children's books, film scripts, plays and fiction. He churned out adaptations of Russian and European classics -- including Mark Twain's "The Prince and the Pauper" -- transforming them according to Politburo-prescribed ideological recipes.
большая потеря для жидпропа
lorad
2009-09-02 04:44:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Anderson
Russian anthem author Mikhalkov dies at 96
AP - 27 August 2009 19:53:25 By MANSUR MIROVALEV
Sergei Mikhalkov, an author favored by Stalin who wrote the lyrics for the Soviet and Russian national anthems, persecuted dissident writers as part of the Soviet propaganda machine and fathered two noted film directors, has died at age 96.
Ta ta tada ta, ta da ta tada ta...pffft!
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